A comparison of stopping by woods on a snowy evening birches and the road not taken by frost

But as his poetic tone became increasingly jaded and didactic, he imagines youth as a time of unchecked freedom that is taken for granted and then lost. The theme of lost innocence becomes particularly poignant for Frost after the horrors of World War I and World War II, in which he witnessed the physical and psychic wounding of entire generations of young people. These encounters culminate in profound realizations or revelations, which have significant consequences for the speakers. Actively engaging with nature—whether through manual labor or exploration—has a variety of results, including self-knowledge, deeper understanding of the human condition, and increased insight into the metaphysical world.

A comparison of stopping by woods on a snowy evening birches and the road not taken by frost

Both have a speaker who is solitary, alone in nature. Both indicate what time of year in which they take place: Both speakers have to make a choice On the surface, these poems seem to have quite a bit in common.

Both speakers have to make a choice: However, the motivations of these speakers seem completely different. The speaker in "Stopping by Woods" is drawn by the solitude he gets to experience in the quiet woods.

Literature | Glossary of Poetic Terms

He longs to remain in the woods which are "lovely, dark and deep" and full of "easy wind and downy flake. But, he has promises, obligations perhaps, that he feels he is bound to keep and a long, long way to go before he can rest.

The speaker of "The Road Not Taken," on the other hand, has no doubt about whether or not he wants to keep moving; the question becomes, for him, which direction to go. Then, rather than reflecting on the appeal of tranquility and solitude, this speaker imagines a future in which he paints his decision as a great deal more meaningful than it actually is.

However, in the future, this speaker plans to tell this story, saying that he "took the [road] less traveled by" other people and that this decision "has made all the difference" in his life. Thus, the speaker in "Stopping by Woods" seems much more earnest: The speaker in "The Road Not Taken" harbors a desire to appear courageous and unique when, really, he has only made a decision that so many others before him have also made.- An Analysis of Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening The images in the poem “Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost are very vivid..

A comparison of stopping by woods on a snowy evening birches and the road not taken by frost

The man telling the story is telling events as they happened in his own eyes. Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing, 13th Edition.

Table of Contents

This title is currently unavailable on myPearsonStore. We recommend Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing, MLA Update Edition, 13th Edition as a replacement.

Marvin Klotz (PhD, New York University) is a professor of English emeritus at California State University, Northridge, where he taught for thirty-three years and won Northridge's distinguished teaching award in He is also the winner of two Fulbright professorships (in Vietnam and Iran) and was a National Endowment for the Arts Summer Fellow initiativeblog.com: $ We would like to show you a description here but the site won’t allow us.

Robert Frost was born in San Francisco, but his family moved to Lawrence, Massachusetts, in following his father’s death.

A comparison of stopping by woods on a snowy evening birches and the road not taken by frost

The move was actually a return, for Frost’s ancestors were originally New Englanders, and Frost became famous for his poetry’s engagement with .

Analysis of Robert Frost’s Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening - Analysis of Robert Frost’s Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening The poem, “Stopping by Woods ” speaks of a time that the author paused during a trip to simply enjoy the quiet and beauty of nature.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost | Poetry Foundation